John, chapters 18 & 19

“My Kingdom is no part of this world. If my Kingdom were part of this world, my attendants would have fought that I should not be handed over […].”
~John 18:36

Throughout history and throughout the world, true Christians have followed Christ’s courageous example of maintaining political neutrality at the cost of their freedom or even their lives.
Like Jesus, we trust that God’s solution to mankind’s problems will be brought about through his own means. (Dan. 2:44)
Prior to the messiah’s coming, servants of Jehovah sometimes held high government rankings, such as King David or the governor Zerubbabel.
But the priests who killed Jesus were hungry for more political power. (John 11:48)
Jesus made it clear that his followers were not to get involved in the political controversies of his time, and the same applies to us. (Mark 8:15; John 17:16)
We can instead participate in the sharing of the kingdom good news- the same “truth” Jesus said he came to bear witness to. (Matt. 6:33; John 18:37)

Luke, chapters 6 & 7

“After looking around at them all, he said to the man: ‘Stretch out your hand.’ He did so, and his hand was restored.”
~Luke 6:10

Did Jesus expect his followers to be charismatic faith healers?
Unlike religious faith healers, Jesus’ healings were not characterized by sensationalist drama and were usually rather casual.(Matt. 8:14, 15; Luke 8:43-48; 17:12-19)
The healings were physically visible. Had they been merely psychosomatic healings, the effects would have worn off sooner or later.
For instance, in the case of the man whose hand was paralyzed, Luke the medic says the hand was literally restored.
That is why not even Jesus’ enemies ever denied that the healings were really taking place.
Instead, they planned to kill Jesus (Luke 6:11; John 11:47,48)
Jesus’ healings served the purpose of signaling him as the messiah and savior of mankind. (Heb. 2:3,4)
But after the Christian congregation were established, some would perform “powerful works” in his name without his approval.(Matt. 7:21-23)
Such miracles would no longer be necessary because love was to be the hallmark trait of true Christians.(1 Cor. 12:27–13:2, 8)
His disciples would display that love by spreading the good news of God’s kingdom to everyone. (Matt. 24:14; 28:19,20)

Job, chapters 28-32

“Did not the One who made me in the womb also make them?
Was it not the same One who formed us before our birth?”

~Job 31:15

Job did not consider himself to be above anyone.
Even at the height of his financial success, prior to his tragic losses, he esteemed his servants and the poor, treating them with dignity and generosity (Job 31:13,14,16-22).
His clean conscience kept him from ever feeling shame when praying to God during his trials.
It is thus important that we imitate his attitude toward those of lesser economic privilege.
For example, when carrying out our Christian commission to share the Good News, do we hold back from speaking with the homeless? (1 Thess. 2:4).
When we knock at the door of a beautiful mansion, do we refrain from sharing our message with the gardener or maid?
We do good in God’s eyes when we ‘do not withhold good from those to whom we should give it, if it is within our power to help,’ (Prov. 3:27).

2 Samuel, chapters 16-18

The watchman said: “I can see that the first man runs like Ahimaaz the son of Zadok,” so the king said: “He is a good man, and he comes with good news.”
~2 Samuel 18:27

The priest Ahimaaz out ran the Cushite messenger commissioned to tell King David that his enemy had fallen (2 Sam. 18:24-32).

This news was not what David wanted to hear, for his enemy was his own son, Absalom (2 Sam. 18:33).

Still, Ahimaaz was determined to deliver the message to David before the Cushite envoy (2 Sam. 18:23).

Ahimaaz’s delivery style emphasized the good news but tactfully left out the bad news, which was then delivered by the second messenger.

Thus David received the news of his son’s death in steps, instead of receiving all the information in one blow.

When Jehovah’s Witnesses approach doors, what are people’s reactions?

Are our neighbors happy to see us because they know we are ‘good people’ who come with “good news?”

Or do they roll their eyes and refuse to open their doors because they do not like our message?

As “ambassadors” of the good news of Christ’s kingdom, we should make a sincere effort to keep our message positive and deliver it in an enthusiastic tone (Eph. 6:19,20).

It helps to be tactful about what Bible passages we choose to share with our neighbors.

Like Ahimaaz, we should be eager to deliver the good news God has entrusted us with, even when we know our audience will dislike some aspects of it.