2 Corinthians, chapters 7-10

“So now, also complete what you started to do, so that your readiness to act may be completed according to the means you have available.”
~2 Corinthians 8:11

It is important to try to follow through on our promises to the best of our abilities.
Perhaps our health has declined and we feel that what we can offer God is no longer good enough.
We may feel irrelevant and be tempted to give up altogether.
But instead of focusing on our limitations, God focuses on what we can do, and on our attitude. (Luke 21:1-4; 2 Cor. 8:12; 9:7)
We can be confident that whatever sacrifices we make in his service do not go unnoticed (Mal. 3:10; 2 Cor. 9:10; Heb. 6:10)

Psalms 52-59

“For you have rescued me from death
And prevented my feet from stumbling,
So that I may walk before God in the light of the living.”
~Psalm 56:13

When I am experiencing particularly stressful situations and I do not see a clear solution, I may come to lose all hope that anything will ever improve.
There were times when the Psalmist David felt that he was “wandering,” but he was conscious that God kept His eye on him (Ps. 56:8).
He knew he was not truly alone.

“Of this I am confident: God is on my side” (Ps. 56:9).

The knowledge that Jehovah God stood by him in all his trials fostered a thankful attitude in David that in turn infused in him a serious sense of compromise toward God.
“I am bound by my vows to you, O God; I will offer you expressions of thanksgiving,” (Ps. 56:12).
This kept him going even under circumstances that could have made him lose heart.
Likewise, when I feel that I am at my wit’s end, remembering that God is keeping a watchful eye over me can keep me from stumbling even into a spiritual or emotional death.
Meditating on the vows I have made to God can keep me from giving up.
Instead of being afraid, I will trust in Jehovah (Ps. 56:3).

Numbers, chapters 30-32

Regarding any vow or any oath involving an abstinence vow to practice self-denial, her husband should establish it or her husband should annul it.
~Numbers 30:13

Under Mosaic Law, if a married Israelite woman made a vow to God, she had to communicate that vow to her husband that same day.

As head of the household, her husband had authority to either establish or annul the vow.

At first view, it seems God did not trust married women to make their own decisions, which could offend some of us.

However seeing it from a financial perspective it makes sense, because it was the husband’s responsibility to make ends meet and so any vow incurred by his wife might affect the family as a whole.

Let’s say for example that the wife vowed to donate 20% of the harvest instead of just the 10% the tithe required.

Now let’s imagine that in that year it did not really rain so there was not much grain to harvest and now they have more than five starving kids to feed.

It would make sense that the husband had the authority to annul his wife’s vow, ‘bearing the consequences of her guilt,’ (Nu. 30:15).

By requiring the vow to be communicated to her husband, the wife was also pressed to think twice before saying compromising things out of sentimentalism that were not thoroughly calculated.

Christian women are not obligated to have their husband’s approval before they enter spiritual compromises.

Many women in the first century converted to Christianity even when their husbands were unbelievers (1 Pet. 3:1).

However, the husband is still considered head of the household, so it is still wise on the part of a wife to communicate her decisions to him either before or soon after taking them, yielding to his advice whenever reasonable (Prov. 13:10; Acts 5:29; 1 Cor. 11:3).

She would thereby demonstrate respect for both Jehovah and her spouse and contribute to the whole family’s success.