1 Corinthians, chapters 15 & 16

“The glory of the sun is one sort, and the glory of the moon is another, and the glory of the stars is another; in fact, one star differs from another star in glory.”
~1 Corinthians 15:41

Bible writers did not have access to modern telescopes but they recognized the universe’s vast greatness escapes our understanding.
The Bible first mentions stars at Genesis 1:1: “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.”
It then mentions them more specifically at verse 16, when they became distinctly visible as light sources from earth.
The Hebrew word for “make” in this verse differs from the verb in verse one, which is to “create,” since the stars already existed when God was terraforming the earth.
Also, the Hebrew word for light in verse 16 is maohr, or “light source.”
The Bible compares the number of actual stars to something as innumerable as the grains of sand. (Heb. 11:12)
It also makes reference to the laws of physics which God has placed to keep stars in orbit. (Jud. 5:20; Job 38:31-33; Jer. 31:35,36)
The great power needed to conduct such an immense celestial orchestra should humbly move us to glorify our creator.

At the Griffith Observatory, there is an exhibit along a large gallery called “The Big Picture,” compiled from 2.46 gigapixels of telescope data.
Seeing the size of our own galaxy in relation to just a portion of our universe is one of the most mind blowing, humbling things I have ever experienced.
(Entry to the observatory is free).

Acts, chapters 27 & 28

“After [Paul] said this, he took bread, gave thanks to God before them all, broke it, and started eating.”
~Acts 27:35

Paul was in Caesarea, on the northwest coast of modern day Israel, when he appealed his case to be heard before Caesar.
He was escorted to Rome under the care of army officer Julius, who treated him fairly. (Acts 25:11; 27:1,3,42,43)
Despite his suggestion that the ship and all aboard stay in Fair Havens for the winter, the journey continued.
Fair Havens was located on the south coast of the island of Crete, and they were trying to reach the nearby port city of Phoenix, about seventy-five kilometers (47 mi) northwest of there.
But shortly after departing, a violent wind drove them southwest past the tiny island of Cauda. (Acts 27:14-16)
They managed not to capsize for around the next 1000 km (620 mi) until they neared the island of Malta.
The crew had started to lighten the load on the second day of the journey, and on the fourteenth day, Paul said: “Today is the 14th day you have been waiting anxiously, and you have gone without taking any food at all.” (Acts 27:18,33)
Paul could have become bitter and self-centered in those circumstances.
He could have focused on the unfairness of his situation.
The account says the storm was battering them and their hope had started to fade. (Acts 27:20)
Still, Paul encouraged others to eat and even thanked God for the provision of bread. (Acts 27:34,35)
How much more productive it is to approach life’s afflictions with faith and a gracious spirit. (Prov. 15:13,15; Eph. 5:20)