Matthew, chapters 6 & 7

“For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”
~Matthew 6:21

What do you value most in life? What consumes the greater part of your time and effort?
Although Jesus did not have wealth or a prominent career, he was obviously successful in carrying out his life’s work.
Doing his father’s will was in his heart, and he found happiness in teaching others God’s kingdom message. (Acts 20:35)
If we were to focus our resources on selfish pursuits, we would probably eventually find them to be vain and unsatisfying. (Eccl. 2:11)
But if we guard our hearts from selfish desires and follow Christ’s example of selflessness, we will discover the happiness that only God can give, while successfully securing our future. (1 Ti. 6:18,19)

Ezekiel, chapters 28-31

“I will cause a horn to sprout for the house of Israel,* and I will give you an opportunity to speak among them […].
*(endow the house of Israel with strength)”
~Ezekiel 29:21

The “horn” metaphor in this passage is meant to illustrate God giving strength to his people. (1 Sam. 2:10)
Although speaking God’s message is a privilege, there are times when we may feel tired and discouraged.
When we feel that way, we rely on God’s power which is “beyond what is normal” to fulfill our ministry. (2 Cor. 4:7; 2 Tim. 4:5)
We do so by praying to him for strength, following Christ’s cheerful example, and by leaving our problems in God’s hands. (1 Sam. 1:10, 18; Acts 20:35)

Jeremiah, chapters 44-48

“The sword of Jehovah!
How long will you not be quiet?
Go back into your sheath.
Take your rest and be silent.
How can it be quiet
When Jehovah has given it a command?”
~Jeremiah 47:6,7

When God pronounces judgment against someone, his word is as good as done.
His word ‘does not return to him without results […] It will certainly accomplish whatever is his delight, and it will have success in what he sends it to do.’ (Isa. 55:10,11)
In contrast, us humans are subject to many circumstances, most of which are outside of our control, and many of our plans fail to come to fruition. (Jam. 4:13,14)
Bearing that in mind, the best way we can ensure our plans will be successful is if we commit our ways to Jehovah. (Ps. 37:5)
Circumstances will try our faith and patience, but God promises to bring about justice to those who serve him. (De. 32:10; Ps. 37:7-9)

2 Chronicles, chapters 10-14

“O Jehovah, it does not matter to you whether those you help are many or have no power […]”
~2 Chronicles 14:11

When the nation of Judah was attacked by Ethiopians, they were outnumbered at least 2 to 1.
King Asa did not turn to a pagan nation for help.
Instead, he relied on Jehovah:

“Help us, O Jehovah our God, for we are relying on you, and in your name we have come against this crowd.”

King Asa was convinced the best help he could get was only a prayer away because he had acted in accordance with God’s will throughout his kingship.
He knew Jehovah blesses those who serve him (2 Chron. 14:3-5).
More importantly, Asa considered it an attack not on his own sovereignty, but on Jehovah’s.
That is why he pleaded, “O Jehovah, you are our God. Do not let mortal man prevail against you,” (2 Chron. 14:11).
Jehovah intervened on their behalf and as a result, Judah was able to destroy its attackers (2 Chron. 14:12-15).
We can trust that Jehovah can and will hold his hand out to us when we face problems with solutions that are beyond us.
And when his people as a whole face a considerable threat, he defends them for the sake of his name and all it represents.
As a result, God’s people prevail even when odds are against them, so long as they demonstrate faith.