1 Kings, chapters 9-11

So Hiram went out from Tyre to see the cities that Solomon had given him, but he was not satisfied with them. He said: “What sort of cities are these that you have given me, my brother?” So they came to be called the Land of Cabul* down to this day. In the meantime, Hiram sent to the king 120 talents of gold.

~1 Kings 9:12-14

*possibly meaning “the land as good as nothing.”

The attitude that King Hiram of Tyre demonstrated toward supporting true worship is worthy of noting.

Before Solomon’s reign, Hiram was a friend to King David, sending him cedar and craftsmen to work on his palace (2 Sam. 5:11).

Once the building of the temple and Solomon’s palace was underway, King Hiram contributed significantly by sending his own best workers to support the 20-year project (1 Ki. 5:6-18).

“He rejoiced greatly and said: ‘May Jehovah be praised today, for he has given David a wise son over this great people!’” (1 Ki. 5:7).

Although this was a business transaction, King Hiram saw Solomon as more than a friend, calling him “my brother” even upon being let down by him.

After receiving the cities that were “good for nothing,” we continue to read about King Hiram’s monetary contributions to King Solomon’s reign (1 Ki. 10:11,12,22).

May we follow his example and continue to view our brothers and sisters in the faith with respect and admiration, ever-willing to support one another, even when we do not feel that they have fulfilled their end of an important agreement.

1 Kings, chapters 7 & 8

King Solomon described Jehovah’s kindness in the context of a deep prayer:

“Whatever prayer, whatever request for favor may be […] (for each one knows the plague of his own heart) […], then may you hear from the heavens, your dwelling place, and may you forgive and take action; and reward each one according to all his ways, for you know his heart (you alone truly know every human heart), so that they may fear you […]” (1 Ki. 8:38-40).

Fearing God in our hearts does not mean we dread God or that we flee from him.

Fear of God implies fear of letting him down, fear of disrespecting him.

Whether or not a person is sincere in their service toward God can only be judged by God himself.

One is assured, however, that regardless of what we do, God pays to each his own.

Imagine someone in a dire situation.

He calls out to God, but God sees that he is insincere.

God does not forgive him.

Not even Jehovah God, the God of all love, kindness and forgiveness, forgives him, because that person is insincere and God can see through his facade.

That would be truly dreadful.

It is different, though, when one serves God.

If you sincerely strive to do what is good because you fear displeasing God, or if you sincerely repent, you can rest assured that Jehovah will listen to your prayer and bless you according to your ways, sooner or later (Ps. 145:16; Rev. 21:3-5).

“O Jehovah the God of Israel, there is no God like you in the heavens above or on the earth beneath, keeping the covenant and showing loyal love to your servants who are walking before you with all their heart,” (1 Ki. 8:23).

1 Kings, chapters 1 and 2

“With that King Solomon swore by Jehovah: ‘So may God do to me and add to it if it was not at the cost of his own life that Adonijah made this request […]'”(1 Ki. 2:23)

Adonijah, who was apparently the eldest of King David’s remaining sons, had already tried to make himself king once (1 Ki. 1:5-10).

David, however, had promised the throne to his son, Solomon (1 Ki. 1:29,30).

Once crowned, Solomon gave this warning regarding Adonijah: “If he behaves in a worthy manner, not a single hair of his will fall to the ground; but if what is bad is found in him, he will have to die,” (1 Ki. 1:52).

Some time after David’s death, Adonijah approached Bathsheba, Solomon’s mother, and complained, “You well know that the kingship was to become mine, and all Israel expected me to become king; but the kingship eluded me and became my brother’s, for it was from Jehovah that it became his. But now there is just one request that I am making of you. Do not turn me away,” (1 Ki. 2:15,16).

Adonijah then proceeded to manipulate Bathsheba into asking Solomon to allow him to marry David’s nurse (1 Ki. 2:17).

At this point in the story, I thought- Did Adonijah actually deserve to die just because he wanted to marry his late father’s nurse?

Upon further investigation, I learned that David’s nurse was actually viewed more as his concubine, even though he’d had no sexual relations with her (1 Ki. 1:1-4).

There was an ancient Middle Eastern custom that the wives and concubines of a king should only belong to his heir after his death (Insight on the Scriptures, vol. I: “Abishag,” par. 2; “Adonijah,” par. 4).

That is why King Solomon viewed Adonijah’s request as yet another attempt to usurp the throne which God had rightfully given him (1 Ki. 2:24,25).

In other words, it was a deceptive scheme masking high treason, and since it undermined King Solomon’s first warning and authority, it merited death.