Revelation, chapters 13-16

“Happy are the dead who die in union with the Lord from this time onward. Yes, says the spirit, let them rest from their labors, for the things they did go right with them.”
~Revelation 14:13

Amidst so many judgments relative to the imminent destruction of the wicked, there is this passage of hope reminding us that Jehovah never forgets what we do for him. (Heb. 6:10) While here it is speaking specifically of the “holy ones” who will reign with Christ in heaven, we can be sure that anyone making sincere sacrifices in God’s name does not go unappreciated. (Mal. 3:16; Rev. 13:10; 14:12)

Hebrews, chapters 9 & 10

“For you need endurance, so that after you have done the will of God, you may receive the fulfillment of the promise.”
~Hebrews 10:36

The work “Insight on the Scriptures” explains that “endurance” in ancient Greek means to “stand one’s ground; persevere; remain steadfast,” and “not lose hope in the face of obstacles.”
Jesus had to wait patiently to receive his heavenly blessings after sacrificing his life, and we do well to imitate his patient attitude. (Heb. 10:12,13)
He taught that what we do towards the end of our Christian ministry counts for more than what we did at the start. (Matt. 24:13; Luke 21:19)
We demonstrate endurance when we look for strength in God’s Word and through prayer, instead of looking for quick and easy short-term solutions to our problems. (Rom. 15:4,5; Jas. 1:5)
We can then face problems with a positive attitude, knowing that without them, we would not have had a chance to demonstrate our faith/hone our Christian qualities. (Rom. 5:3-5; Jas. 1:2-4)
Though God’s promises might sometimes feel like they are too far off, endurance helps us remember that they “will not delay.” (Heb. 10:37)

Hebrews, chapters 4-6

“[…] A promise of entering into his rest remains […].”
~Hebrews 4:1

Although Jehovah God rested from his creative works on the “seventh day” of creation, there remains a figurative “sabbath” day into which God’s people will enter. (Gen. 2:2,3; John 5:17) This will be when the earth becomes a paradise free of evil, pain or sin, as was God’s original purpose. (Ps. 37:9-11; Is. 33:24; Matt. 5:3-6; 12:8-13; Luke 13:10-13; John 5:5-9; 9:1-14)
That God’s original purpose of a paradise earth will be accomplished is guaranteed by his own word, which is immutable. (Heb. 6:17,18)
Whether we end up entering into God’s rest in person or through the resurrection, we can be sure that our efforts to listen to him and do what is right are never in vain. (Heb. 6:9,10)

Hebrews, chapters 1-3

“Look! I and the young children, whom Jehovah gave me.”
~Hebrews 2:13

This passage is a quote from the book of Isaiah, in which the prophet and his children were to serve as “signs” to the people of Judah. (Is. 8:18)
But the prophet foreshadowed Christ’s role as a means to salvation from death. (Heb. 2:14,15)
His “children” are the annointed members of the Christian congregation who are to rule in heaven with him. (Gal. 3:29; Heb. 2:16)
They serve as signs to us when they proclaim God’s kingdom message of justice. (Luke 4:18,19)
The tenderness with which Jesus views his brothers and sisters upon calling them “children” inspires one to draw closer to his congregation.

1 Timothy, chapters 1-3

“This is fine and acceptable in the sight of our Savior, God, whose will is that all sorts of people should be saved and come to an accurate knowledge of truth.”
~1 Timothy 2:3,4

A few days ago I (a Latina woman) was witnessing door to door with a White brother when we came upon a house of a Trump supporter.
I asked the brother to speak to the men in the garage even though it was my turn to talk.
I assumed that the men who lived there were White supremacists and would not want to talk to me.
One of the men complained that door to door ministers do not stop at his house because ‘they are afraid of him.’
He politely went on to ask a sincere Bible question.
I wonder how they would have received me had I been the one to greet them.
Many people hold erroneous ideals because they ignore the Bible’s “accurate knowledge of truth.”
Even those of us who have been studying God’s Word for years can have trouble seeing past our own prejudices from time to time.
For instance, a fellow believer asked me if my husband is in the country legally.
I pointed out that she would not be asking me that question if my husband and I were White.
Later, she said she does not see differences in race or ethnicity because we are all the same before God.
She is not from this area and she apologized and said she had always been curious about immigration issues.
These experiences have reminded me that I must progressively view all people as equal in their potential to serve God and be saved.
What a relief it is to know that despite our limiting imperfections, Jehovah God does truly seek out and find deserving ones regardless of ethnicity. (Zech. 8:23; Matt. 10:11; 24:14; 28:19,20; Rev. 14:6)

1 Thessalonians, chapters 1-5

“[…] Just as you are in fact walking, we request you and appeal to you by the Lord Jesus to keep doing it more fully.”
1 Thessalonians 4:1

The members of the Christian congregation in Thessalonica were not perfect.
They had moral standards and love, but could improve on both counts. (1 Thess. 4:3,4,9,10)
That is why Paul commended them while tactfully encouraging them to “pursue what is good toward one another.” (1 Thess. 5:15)
Regardless of how long it has been since we became Christians, ‘making sure of all things’ and ‘holding fast to what is fine’ is something we have to remember to do every day. (1 Thess. 5:4,6,8,21)
We cannot afford to take our faith for granted, and as long as we are imperfect, there will be things we can improve on.

2 Corinthians, chapters 4-6

“Working together with him, we also urge you not to accept the undeserved kindness of God and miss its purpose.
For he says: ‘In an acceptable time I heard you, and in a day of salvation I helped you.’
Look! Now is the especially acceptable time. Look! Now is the day of salvation.”
~2 Corinthians 6:1,2

Serving God is not necessarily easy nor fun. While it is not burdensome, it does entail considerable effort and sacrifice. (Matt. 7:13,14; Phil. 3:12-14; 1 John 5:3)
It may be tempting to take the easy way out and leave drawing closer to God for a future time when life is more “settled” or we feel more “prepared.”
The reason God’s Day has not come is because he wants us to repent. (Rom. 2:4; 2 Pet. 3:9)
But we do not know what will happen tomorrow or a couple years down the line. (Jas. 4:13,14)
Even if we spent 80 or 90 years studying about Jehovah and Jesus, we would still have so much more to learn about them and all they have done for us. (Job 26:14)
We cannot store up time and return it to God at a later date.
If we meditate on how we can draw closer to him today, we will have fewer regrets when we finally do run out of time. (Is. 30:18; 55:6; Eph. 4:30; Jas. 4:17)