Matthew, chapters 22 & 23

“Regarding the resurrection of the dead, have you not read what was spoken to you by God, who said: ‘I am the God of Abraham and the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob’? He is the God, not of the dead, but of the living.”
~Matthew 22:31,32

In the gospel of Luke, the account adds: “For they are all living to him.” (Luke 20:38)
On being asked about the plausibility of a resurrection, Jesus quoted Jehovah’s words to Moses.(Ex. 3:6; Matt. 22:23)
When God referred to himself as the God of Abraham, Abraham had been dead for hundreds of years.
Though the prophets are literally dead, the promise of the resurrection is so sure to be realized that to God, it is as if they are living. (Eccl. 9:5,10; Ro.4:16,17)
Likewise, a person who is physically alive may as well be dead to God if that person commits themselves to an immoral lifestyle. (Ge. 2:17; 1 Tim. 5:6)
When we try to see life and time from Jehovah’s point of view, we can find true comfort in the resurrection hope.

Psalms 69-73

​”He will have pity on the lowly and the poor, […] And their blood will be precious in his eyes.” 
~Psalm 72:13,14

In a time when gun violence and terrorist attacks are tragically commonplace, it is comforting to remember how valuable human life is to Jehovah God.
He does not see loss of life as this week’s statistics or another news headline.
Not only does God know when someone dies, he cares for those affected on an individual level (Matt. 10:29-31; 1 Pet. 5:7).

Why is human life so valuable?
Genesis chapter one verse twenty-seven explains that we are created in God’s image.
We are capable of displaying such noble qualities as selflessness, loyalty, reason and faith.
We are capable of creating new things and of caring for species other than our own.
Human life is so valuable that God redeemed us from death through the sacrifice of His son (John 3:16).

Adding to the sanctity of life is the fact that it streams directly from Jehovah Himself (Ps. 36:9).

What a comfort it is, then, to meditate on God’s plans for us to inherit “the real life” in which violence will be no more (1 Tim. 6:19; Rev. 21:4).