Galatians, chapters 1-3

“All of you who were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. […] You are all one in union with Christ Jesus.”
~Galatians 3:27,28

We are all equally valuable within the congregation, regardless of our gender, ethnicity, social class, or whatever we identified as before becoming Christians.
Jesus gave his life for us each as individuals.
That is why we strive to give up our old divisive attitudes and humbly learn to see all our brothers and sisters with honor and appreciation (Rom. 12:10; Gal. 2:20; Eph. 4:24)

Job, chapters 28-32

“Did not the One who made me in the womb also make them?
Was it not the same One who formed us before our birth?”

~Job 31:15

Job did not consider himself to be above anyone.
Even at the height of his financial success, prior to his tragic losses, he esteemed his servants and the poor, treating them with dignity and generosity (Job 31:13,14,16-22).
His clean conscience kept him from ever feeling shame when praying to God during his trials.
It is thus important that we imitate his attitude toward those of lesser economic privilege.
For example, when carrying out our Christian commission to share the Good News, do we hold back from speaking with the homeless? (1 Thess. 2:4).
When we knock at the door of a beautiful mansion, do we refrain from sharing our message with the gardener or maid?
We do good in God’s eyes when we ‘do not withhold good from those to whom we should give it, if it is within our power to help,’ (Prov. 3:27).

2 Chronicles, chapters 15-19

“Now let the fear of Jehovah be upon you. Be careful about what you do, for with Jehovah our God there is no injustice, no partiality, no bribe-taking.”
~2 Chronicles 19:7

When King Jehoshaphat of Judah appointed judges over God’s people, he instructed them to fear God and be impartial.
Nowadays, we can observe much discord and unrest in society due to statistics in the criminal justice system that suggest institutional racism.
In the above Bible passage, we learn that the key to fair judgment is the fear of God.
If an authority-figure believes that a higher power will ultimately hold him accountable for his motives and choices, his sense of justice should move him to avoid prejudiced judgments.
Thus, when society as a whole has little to no fear of God, social disparity increases.

Leviticus, chapters 21-24

No unauthorized person may eat anything holy. No foreign guest of a priest or hired worker may eat anything holy. But if a priest should purchase someone with his own money, that person may share in eating it. Slaves born in his house may also share in eating his food.
~Leviticus 22:10,11

This text implies that circumcised foreigners who had been bought as laborers were thereafter considered to make up part of the priest’s household.

The priest’s immediate family members could also partake in holy meals.

Daughters were considered a part of the household if they were single, divorced or widowed and did not have children who could care for their needs (Lev. 22:13).

Jehovah truly extends his kindness toward every person regardless of their origin (Matt. 5:45).

From these verses we can gather at least a couple lessons:

1. God has his own arrangements as to who can enjoy things that he considers to be His own and how those things are enjoyed.

When we respect those arrangements, we are demonstrating godly devotion, especially if that implies making certain personal sacrifices (1 Tim. 6:6).

2. God is not partial toward any “but in every nation the man who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him,” (Acts 10:34,35).

Therefor we should make a genuine effort to eradicate racist or prejudice notions that may have been engrained in us as children and that keep us from extending our hospitality toward members of our own faith who come from different roots.