Isaiah, chapters 29-33

“Jehovah is waiting patiently to show you favor,
And he will rise up to show you mercy. […]”
~Isaiah 30:18

God’s people had sinned against him time after time, yet he trusted some of them would see the error of their way and return to him. (Is. 31:6,7)
To those who listened, God promised rich blessings.
“The cattle and the donkeys that work the ground will eat fodder seasoned with sorrel, which was winnowed with the shovel and the pitchfork.” (Is. 30:23,24)
Sorrel is a tangy luxury herb used in salads for human consumption.
Grains which are winnowed have been refined and are also for human consumption.
These verses are therefore making reference to the richness of God’s blessings that await anyone who wholeheartedly repents and changes for the better.
Currently we can enjoy a strong relationship with our heavenly father, and in the future, perfect health in a peaceful, just world. (Is. 32:15-18; 33:24)

Psalms 26-33

“This is why every loyal one will pray to you
While you may yet be found.”
~Psalm 32:6

Who does God consider to be a “loyal one”?
The previous verse is referring to someone who confesses their sins to God and whom God pardons (Psalm 32:5).
Since we are all imperfect sinners, to remain close to Him I must first recognize and value the extent of His mercy and kindness toward me.
If I trust in Jehovah, He will ‘surround me with His loyal love’ and, despite my errors, I will be able to rejoice joyfully among the righteous (Psalm 32:10,11).
In effect, it is possible for God to consider us, mere sinners, as being “upright in heart,” so long as we do not try to deceive Him.
And when we recognize the immense value of this, we may even find happiness  (Psalm 32:1,2).

Psalms 19-25

“Though I walk in the valley of deep shadow,
I fear no harm,
For you are with me […]”

~Psalm 23:4

There are periods in life which may be likened to dark valleys.
Perhaps we are depressed or experiencing high levels of anxiety.
In another Psalm, David wrote:

“Turn your face to me and show me favor,
For I am alone and helpless.
The distresses of my heart have multiplied;
Free me from my anguish,” (Ps. 25:16, 17).

How, then, does Jehovah God present himself at my side when I feel alone and anxious?
In the next verse, the writer prays: “Pardon all my sins,” making a connection between the sins and his affliction (Ps. 25:18).

One of the ways Jehovah draws close is by forgiving.
But in order to appreciate His pardon I must have the right motives.

“For the sake of your name,
O Jehovah,
Forgive my error,
though it is great,” (Ps. 25:11).

True repentance involves recognizing that the most important thing at stake is not how I feel, but Jehovah’s name with everything it represents, including mercy.
To have that point of view, I must first cultivate a healthy fear of God and humility to let myself accept His guidance (Ps. 25:12).

At that point, I will no longer fear alone or anxious because God’s “rod and staff” will have reassured me, making the darkness bearable (Ps. 23:4).