Job, chapters 28-32

“Did not the One who made me in the womb also make them?
Was it not the same One who formed us before our birth?”

~Job 31:15

Job did not consider himself to be above anyone.
Even at the height of his financial success, prior to his tragic losses, he esteemed his servants and the poor, treating them with dignity and generosity (Job 31:13,14,16-22).
His clean conscience kept him from ever feeling shame when praying to God during his trials.
It is thus important that we imitate his attitude toward those of lesser economic privilege.
For example, when carrying out our Christian commission to share the Good News, do we hold back from speaking with the homeless? (1 Thess. 2:4).
When we knock at the door of a beautiful mansion, do we refrain from sharing our message with the gardener or maid?
We do good in God’s eyes when we ‘do not withhold good from those to whom we should give it, if it is within our power to help,’ (Prov. 3:27).

2 Chronicles, chapters 15-19

“Now let the fear of Jehovah be upon you. Be careful about what you do, for with Jehovah our God there is no injustice, no partiality, no bribe-taking.”
~2 Chronicles 19:7

When King Jehoshaphat of Judah appointed judges over God’s people, he instructed them to fear God and be impartial.
Nowadays, we can observe much discord and unrest in society due to statistics in the criminal justice system that suggest institutional racism.
In the above Bible passage, we learn that the key to fair judgment is the fear of God.
If an authority-figure believes that a higher power will ultimately hold him accountable for his motives and choices, his sense of justice should move him to avoid prejudiced judgments.
Thus, when society as a whole has little to no fear of God, social disparity increases.