1 Corinthians, chapters 15 & 16

“The glory of the sun is one sort, and the glory of the moon is another, and the glory of the stars is another; in fact, one star differs from another star in glory.”
~1 Corinthians 15:41

Bible writers did not have access to modern telescopes but they recognized the universe’s vast greatness escapes our understanding.
The Bible first mentions stars at Genesis 1:1: “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.”
It then mentions them more specifically at verse 16, when they became distinctly visible as light sources from earth.
The Hebrew word for “make” in this verse differs from the verb in verse one, which is to “create,” since the stars already existed when God was terraforming the earth.
Also, the Hebrew word for light in verse 16 is maohr, or “light source.”
The Bible compares the number of actual stars to something as innumerable as the grains of sand. (Heb. 11:12)
It also makes reference to the laws of physics which God has placed to keep stars in orbit. (Jud. 5:20; Job 38:31-33; Jer. 31:35,36)
The great power needed to conduct such an immense celestial orchestra should humbly move us to glorify our creator.

At the Griffith Observatory, there is an exhibit along a large gallery called “The Big Picture,” compiled from 2.46 gigapixels of telescope data.
Seeing the size of our own galaxy in relation to just a portion of our universe is one of the most mind blowing, humbling things I have ever experienced.
(Entry to the observatory is free).

Romans, chapters 15 & 16

“Now may the God who supplies endurance and comfort grant you to have among yourselves the same mental attitude that Christ Jesus had.”
~Romans 15:5

Paul had just advised Christians who were strong in the faith to selflessly bear the weaknesses of others. (Rom 15:1-3)
This requires a lot of humility and is not an easy thing to nurture in ourselves.
Being imperfect, we tend towards selfishness. (Eccl. 7:20; Rom. 7:18,19; 12:16)
Every day we have to struggle against the negative, discontent, self-centered spirit in the world. (Eph. 2:2; 4:17,18)
We may relate to the following statement: “Our obvious imperfection, standing in sharp contrast with the perfect pattern that Jesus left us, may at times cause us to be discouraged. We may doubt that having the same mental attitude that Jesus had is even possible.”
Despite our inability to carry out everything God requires of us, we can still serve him in a way that pleases him.
We can read about dozens of exemplary people in the Bible who managed to serve him faithfully and be inspired to imitate their humble attitudes.(Rom. 15:4)

Acts, chapters 21 & 22

“You see, brother, how many thousands of believers there are among the Jews, and they are all zealous for the Law. But they have heard it rumored about you that you have been teaching all the Jews among the nations an apostasy from Moses […].”
~Acts 21:20,21

I can’t quite seem to wrap my head around how the elders in Jerusalem sent Paul into clear and present danger based on rumors.
While they must have had the best intentions when ordering Paul to go into the temple, I cannot imagine modern elders ever asking a member of the congregation to make such a bold statement at the risk of his or her life. (Acts 21:4,11,12)
Their decision is all the more surprising because in a way, the people they were trying to win over were immature Christians who were unwilling to part with Jewish customs. (Acts 21:24,27,28; Rom. 2:28,29)
Paul humbly acceded, willing to make just about any personal sacrifice to settle divisiveness. (1 Cor.9:20)
Rather than crouch away from responsibility, he seized the opportunity to try to ‘legally establish the good news’ not only in Jerusalem, but throughout the Roman empire. (Acts 24:10-22; 25:10-12; Php. 1:7)
Most Christians today will never have to put themselves in life-threatening situations to prove their faith in God’s Word, but from time to time our humility is tested when our elders ask us to do something that does not make sense to us.
We should always try to put the congregation’s peace and unity before personal opinions. (Php. 1:8-10)

Acts, chapters 19 & 20

“I do not consider my own life of any importance to me, if only I may finish my course and the ministry that I received from the Lord Jesus, to bear thorough witness to the good news of the undeserved kindness of God.”
~Acts 20:24

Paul did not feel entitled to the privilege of teaching others about Christ.
He humbly recognized that he was a sinner and attributed the success of his ministry to Jehovah God. (1 Cor. 3:6; 15:9,10; 1 Tim. 1:12,13)
When a need for financial aid struck the congregation in Jerusalem, Paul personally risked his life to carry relief over to them. (Rom. 15:25,26)
He fulfilled his sense of debt towards God, grateful for the ransom sacrifice that allowed him to be God’s friend. (2 Cor. 5:18)
If we have the privilege of sharing God’s good news with others, may we equally treasure it.

Jeremiah, chapters 29-31

“[…] ‘You will search for me with all your heart. And I will let you find me,’ declares Jehovah.”
~Jeremiah 29:13,14

How do we show God we are sincerely searching for him?
One way is through heartfelt prayer.
“Make me know your ways, O Jehovah; Teach me your paths.” (Ps. 25:4)
Like the psalmist, we need to display humility and recognize we need God’s guidance.
Jehovah invites even those who have strayed from him to come back to him.
“If you search for Jehovah your God from there, you will certainly find him, if you inquire for him with all your heart and with all your soul. When you are in great distress and all these things have happened to you in later times, then you will return to Jehovah your God and listen to his voice. For Jehovah your God is a merciful God. He will not desert you […]” (De. 4:29-31)
But it is not enough to recognize our own sins. (La. 3:41,42)
Seeking Jehovah implies learning about his personality: what God likes and dislikes and then conforming to his standards. (Je. 31:34)
To find God, we must try to imitate his mercy, ridding ourselves of feelings of hatred toward those who have wronged us. (Mt. 6:12)
Then God allows us to find his peace and a solid hope for the future. (Jer. 29:11,12)

Jeremiah, chapters 8-11

“Correct me, O Jehovah, with judgment,
But not in your anger, that you may not reduce me to nothing.”
~Jeremiah 10:24

We all need to be corrected from time to time, either by someone at work, or if we are younger, by our parents or teachers, or we may be counseled by a mature, caring friend.
It is human nature to initially be embarrassed and even to resist the correction.
Jehovah corrected his People through his prophets.
We do not have modern-day prophets, but we can read God’s recorded thoughts in his written Word, and find God’s counsel under prayer through Bible reading.
To accept God’s correction, we need to humbly recognize that, despite having freedom of choice, it is not in our best interest to act independently of God. (Jer. 10:23)
It is easier to accept correction as soon as we realize we are doing something wrong, without needing to wait for someone to blatantly point out our mistakes to us.
But if it comes to that, and we are privately or publicly reproved, let us remember that Jehovah takes the time to discipline those whom he loves and wants to keep by his side.
Everyone needs to be refined by God’s love and he expects you to keep trying. (Heb. 12:5,6)
As one brother put it, it is better to accept correction now than to ‘be reduced to nothing’ on God’s Judgment Day.

Isaiah, chapters 43-46

​”[…] Let us bring our case against each other; Tell your side of it to prove you are in the right.”
~Isaiah 43:26

Would you be audacious enough to argue against God to his face?
Could you really hope to prove anything to the One who formed you and everything else in the universe? (Is. 44:24)

“Woe to the one who contends with his Maker,
For he is just an earthenware fragment […].
Should the clay say to the Potter: ‘What are you making?’ […]
Would you question me about the things coming
And command me about my sons and the works of my hands?”
(Is. 45:9,11)

God Jehovah is constant and unchanging. (Is. 43:10)
Unlike us humans who wear out and may sometimes have a change of heart, God’s purpose endures forever. (Is. 46:10,11)
It would be very foolish of us to stubbornly refuse God’s means of salvation even if there are some aspects of it we struggle with on a personal level. (Is. 43:11; 46:12,13)
God offers the waters of salvation through his written Word to those who humbly leave behind their former ways. (Is. 43:18-20)