John, chapters 18 & 19

“My Kingdom is no part of this world. If my Kingdom were part of this world, my attendants would have fought that I should not be handed over […].”
~John 18:36

Throughout history and throughout the world, true Christians have followed Christ’s courageous example of maintaining political neutrality at the cost of their freedom or even their lives.
Like Jesus, we trust that God’s solution to mankind’s problems will be brought about through his own means. (Dan. 2:44)
Prior to the messiah’s coming, servants of Jehovah sometimes held high government rankings, such as King David or the governor Zerubbabel.
But the priests who killed Jesus were hungry for more political power. (John 11:48)
Jesus made it clear that his followers were not to get involved in the political controversies of his time, and the same applies to us. (Mark 8:15; John 17:16)
We can instead participate in the sharing of the kingdom good news- the same “truth” Jesus said he came to bear witness to. (Matt. 6:33; John 18:37)

Daniel, chapters 1-3

“At that time Daniel discreetly and cautiously spoke to Arioch the chief of the king’s bodyguard, who had gone out to kill the wise men of Babylon.”
~Daniel 2:14

Daniel and his Jewish companions had been brought from Jerusalem to Babylon to be trained in the knowledge of the Chaldeans and used in the king’s service. (Da. 1:3-7)
Babylonian culture being very superstitious, the king asked his circle of conjurers to explain to him the meaning of a dream he had without telling any of them what the dream itself was. (Da. 2:1-3)
Because this was impossible for them, the king ordered the death of all the “wise men,” including that of Daniel and his friends, who until then, ignored what was going on.
Daniel used discretion and caution when requesting information from the guard who had been sent to kill them.
Daniel set a good example of why God’s people should show respect toward government officials even when we are being treated unjustly. (1 Pe. 2:23)
As a result, Daniel was given Jehovah’s blessing and everyone’s life was spared. (Da. 2:47-49)

Isaiah, chapters 24-28

“[…] Like heat is subdued by the shadow of a cloud,
So the song of the tyrants is silenced.”
~Isaiah 25:5

God’s Word has long prophesied the end of all evil.
How will this be realized?
Isaiah foretells that God “will turn his attention to the army of the heights above and to the kings of the earth upon the earth.” (Is. 24:21)
The “army of the heights above” represents the wicked forces of the spirit realm, so described by the Christian prophet Paul (Eph. 6:12)
The “kings of the earth” are the imperfect humans that govern over humanity.
They fail to recognize Christ’s kingdom and act as if they will not have to render an account to God for their corrupt actions. (Eccl. 8:9)
Instead of doing Jehovah’s will, they succumb to their own selfish interests, thereby realizing the will of Satan and his demonic forces (John 12:31; 1 John 5:19)
Referring to “the army of the heights,” the prophet Isaiah says they will be gathered into a pit, like prisoners, and shut up in the dungeon. (Is. 25:22)
This coincides with the Apostle John’s prophecy in which he describes an angel hurling Satan into an abyss and locking him up for 1,000 years (Re. 20:1-3)
At the end of that period, Satan and his remaining supporters will face the same fate that corrupt leaders will have already faced: hopeless annihilation. (Re. 20:7-10)
At that time, those people who remain, including those who will have been resurrected, will be individually judged and be granted either eternal life or permanent death.
Finally, the ultimate tyrant, Death itself, will be forever silenced (1 Co. 15:22-26; Re. 20:13-15)

Isaiah, Chapters 6-10

“Look! The true Lord, Jehovah of armies, Is chopping off branches with a terrible crash; The tallest trees are being cut down, And the lofty are brought low.”
~Isaiah 10:33

God has the power to bring down whomever he chooses.
Although he has for the most part left humanity to follow its own course, there are times when he has decided to remove or limit power from certain governors. (Eccl. 8:9)
For example, in ancient Israel, God’s angel put to death the Assyrian regime that had camped outside of Jerusalem. (2 Chron. 32:21; Is. 37:36)
God’s Word states that in the future, he will do away with all imperfect governments and only Christ will rule the earth from heaven. (Is. 9:6,7; Da. 2:44)
It does not matter how powerful a ruler thinks he is; in God’s eyes he is just a person who will eventually be put in his place. (Is. 7:9b; 8:12,13)