1 Thessalonians, chapters 1-5

“[…] Just as you are in fact walking, we request you and appeal to you by the Lord Jesus to keep doing it more fully.”
1 Thessalonians 4:1

The members of the Christian congregation in Thessalonica were not perfect.
They had moral standards and love, but could improve on both counts. (1 Thess. 4:3,4,9,10)
That is why Paul commended them while tactfully encouraging them to “pursue what is good toward one another.” (1 Thess. 5:15)
Regardless of how long it has been since we became Christians, ‘making sure of all things’ and ‘holding fast to what is fine’ is something we have to remember to do every day. (1 Thess. 5:4,6,8,21)
We cannot afford to take our faith for granted, and as long as we are imperfect, there will be things we can improve on.

2 Samuel, chapters 16-18

The watchman said: β€œI can see that the first man runs like Ahimaaz the son of Zadok,” so the king said: β€œHe is a good man, and he comes with good news.”
~2 Samuel 18:27

The priest Ahimaaz out ran the Cushite messenger commissioned to tell King David that his enemy had fallen (2 Sam. 18:24-32).

This news was not what David wanted to hear, for his enemy was his own son, Absalom (2 Sam. 18:33).

Still, Ahimaaz was determined to deliver the message to David before the Cushite envoy (2 Sam. 18:23).

Ahimaaz’s delivery style emphasized the good news but tactfully left out the bad news, which was then delivered by the second messenger.

Thus David received the news of his son’s death in steps, instead of receiving all the information in one blow.

When Jehovah’s Witnesses approach doors, what are people’s reactions?

Are our neighbors happy to see us because they know we are ‘good people’ who come with “good news?”

Or do they roll their eyes and refuse to open their doors because they do not like our message?

As “ambassadors” of the good news of Christ’s kingdom, we should make a sincere effort to keep our message positive and deliver it in an enthusiastic tone (Eph. 6:19,20).

It helps to be tactful about what Bible passages we choose to share with our neighbors.

Like Ahimaaz, we should be eager to deliver the good news God has entrusted us with, even when we know our audience will dislike some aspects of it.