Matthew, chapters 22 & 23

“Regarding the resurrection of the dead, have you not read what was spoken to you by God, who said: ‘I am the God of Abraham and the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob’? He is the God, not of the dead, but of the living.”
~Matthew 22:31,32

In the gospel of Luke, the account adds: “For they are all living to him.” (Luke 20:38)
On being asked about the plausibility of a resurrection, Jesus quoted Jehovah’s words to Moses.(Ex. 3:6; Matt. 22:23)
When God referred to himself as the God of Abraham, Abraham had been dead for hundreds of years.
Though the prophets are literally dead, the promise of the resurrection is so sure to be realized that to God, it is as if they are living. (Eccl. 9:5,10; Ro.4:16,17)
Likewise, a person who is physically alive may as well be dead to God if that person commits themselves to an immoral lifestyle. (Ge. 2:17; 1 Tim. 5:6)
When we try to see life and time from Jehovah’s point of view, we can find true comfort in the resurrection hope.

Malachi, chapters 1-4

“[…] Jehovah kept paying attention and listening. And a book of remembrance was written before him for those fearing Jehovah and for those meditating on his name.”
~Malachi 3:16

We should not fear that God is so busy or we are so insignificant that he does not notice our day-to-day trials.
Jehovah wants us to know he does care.
He compassionately searches the earth for those who love righteousness, and if one dies, that person is safe in God’s memory until the resurrection. (Job 34:21; Ps. 56:8; Mal. 3:17; Acts 24:15)

Daniel, chapters 10-12

“[…} Many of those asleep in the dust of the earth will wake up, some to everlasting life and others to reproach and to everlasting contempt. […]
But as for you, go on to the end. You will rest, but you will stand up for your lot at the end of the days.”
~Daniel 12:2,13

What a beautiful hope God has given us in the promise of a resurrection for those who have died.
Centuries after Daniel lived, with the resurrection of Jesus Christ in spirit form, a new type of resurrection hope was eventually introduced to humanity. (Luke 12:32; 22:28-30; John 10:14-16; 1 Pet. 1:3-5)
Still, the resurrection most of us look forward to is the original one promised to take place here on a paradise earth. (Job 14:14,15; Ps. 37:29; Is. 26:19; John 11:24; Acts 24:15; Rev. 21:3-5)
Five years ago on this date, we unexpectedly lost a very kind-hearted friend who always gave everyone of his time.
Many of us looked up to him and asked him for advice, and he always followed up on it.
I knew him as a young girl, but in adulthood he became my husband’s friend.
Although I have lost friends and family to death, the date of his parting sticks with me because it was my first day at a new job.
I drove by his place of death later that morning, noticing an accident, unaware of what had happened.
Then I drove by the same spot everyday for the next four years, and every single morning I wished I could go back in time and warn him to take things easier and not overwork himself.
But he gave his all to God, and even if I could warn him, he would still work as diligently as he did to help others.
What is more, if it is impossible for us imperfect humans to forget our loved ones whom we’ve lost, how could God in his perfect love ever forget them? (Heb. 6:10)
Like Daniel, many faithful servants of God await in rest until God calls their name and blesses them with everlasting life.
Who do you want to see again?

Isaiah, chapters 24-28

“[…] Like heat is subdued by the shadow of a cloud,
So the song of the tyrants is silenced.”
~Isaiah 25:5

God’s Word has long prophesied the end of all evil.
How will this be realized?
Isaiah foretells that God “will turn his attention to the army of the heights above and to the kings of the earth upon the earth.” (Is. 24:21)
The “army of the heights above” represents the wicked forces of the spirit realm, so described by the Christian prophet Paul (Eph. 6:12)
The “kings of the earth” are the imperfect humans that govern over humanity.
They fail to recognize Christ’s kingdom and act as if they will not have to render an account to God for their corrupt actions. (Eccl. 8:9)
Instead of doing Jehovah’s will, they succumb to their own selfish interests, thereby realizing the will of Satan and his demonic forces (John 12:31; 1 John 5:19)
Referring to “the army of the heights,” the prophet Isaiah says they will be gathered into a pit, like prisoners, and shut up in the dungeon. (Is. 25:22)
This coincides with the Apostle John’s prophecy in which he describes an angel hurling Satan into an abyss and locking him up for 1,000 years (Re. 20:1-3)
At the end of that period, Satan and his remaining supporters will face the same fate that corrupt leaders will have already faced: hopeless annihilation. (Re. 20:7-10)
At that time, those people who remain, including those who will have been resurrected, will be individually judged and be granted either eternal life or permanent death.
Finally, the ultimate tyrant, Death itself, will be forever silenced (1 Co. 15:22-26; Re. 20:13-15)

2 Kings, chapters 12-15

“As some men were burying a man, they saw the marauder band, so they quickly threw the man into Elisha’s burial place and ran off. When the man touched the bones of Elisha, he came to life and stood on his feet.”
~2 Kings 13:21

Although the Bible mentions other resurrection accounts,* this is only one of two resurrections realized directly by Jehovah God (the other being that of Jesus) (1 Cor. 15:3-6).

Elisha had already been buried when this second cadaver was thrown into his grave, and since there is no consciousness in the grave, the resurrection should be credited to Jehovah, not Elisha, who to this day has no idea that his bones resurrected a man, because he is dead (Eccl. 9:5).

That Jehovah should be so merciful as to restore a random dead man’s life to him demonstrates God’s power and will to resurrect the millions of people who have been swallowed up by death (Ps. 141:7; Acts 24:15).

This will shall be carried out under Christ’s rule when his kingdom blessings have reached the earth (Matt. 6:10).

*The other resurrection accounts can be found at: 1 Kings 17:17-24; 2 Kings 4:32-37; Luke 7:11-17; 8:40-42; 8:49-56; John 11:38-44; Acts 9:36-42; 20:7-12.

2 Kings, chapters 1-4

“At this the boy’s mother said: ‘As surely as Jehovah is living and as you yourself are living, I will not leave you.’ So he got up and went with her.”
~2 Kings 4:30

The Shunammite woman is worthy of noting because of the fine example of faith, respect and hospitality that she displayed.
She displayed hospitality toward the prophet Elisha by offering him meals and a room to stay in, without expecting anything in return (2 Ki. 4:8-10, 13, 14).
She displayed respect toward her husband’s position as head of the household by consulting him before carrying out important decisions, despite being a “prominent woman,” (2 Ki. 4:8-10, 22, 23).
And she displayed faith in God because when her only son died, she ran and then clung to the prophet until he resolved to go see him (2 Ki. 4:19-21, 27-31).
Years earlier, when the prophet had promised her a son, she had replied, “Do not tell lies to your servant,” (2 Ki. 4:16).
Now, under these tragic circumstances, she firmly told her husband, “Everything is all right,” because she knew Elisha’s predecessor had resurrected a boy under similar circumstances (1 Ki. 17:20-22; 2 Ki. 4:23).
The Shunammite woman’s faith and behavior were compensated when her son’s life was restored to him (2 Ki. 4:35-37).
It is as Jesus stated, “Whoever receives a prophet because he is a prophet will get a prophet’s reward,” (Matt. 10:41).
Therefor we should hold fast to our faith in the resurrection and demonstrate our faith with actions.

Numbers, chapters 17-21

Then Jehovah said to Moses and Aaron: […]“Aaron will be gathered to his people. He will not enter the land that I will give to the Israelites […]”
Numbers 20:23,24

The obedience with which Aaron approached his own death is worth noting.
The passage continues to read:
Moses did just as Jehovah had commanded, and they climbed Mount Hor before the eyes of all the assembly. Then Moses removed Aaron’s garments and clothed El·e·a′zar his son with them. After that Aaron died there on the top of the mountain. And Moses and El·e·a′zar came down from the mountain (Nu. 20:27,28).
Aaron had already rebelled once when he and Moses took undue credit for providing the people with water at Meribah (Nu. 20:12).
Evidently he learned his lesson and when his time came to pass away, he was faithful til the end, humbly yielding his position to his son in alignment with God’s arrangements.
Although most people are unaware of when their lives will end, it is wise to live each day with an obedient, humble attitude such as the one displayed by Aaron.