Isaiah, chapters 29-33

“Jehovah is waiting patiently to show you favor,
And he will rise up to show you mercy. […]”
~Isaiah 30:18

God’s people had sinned against him time after time, yet he trusted some of them would see the error of their way and return to him. (Is. 31:6,7)
To those who listened, God promised rich blessings.
“The cattle and the donkeys that work the ground will eat fodder seasoned with sorrel, which was winnowed with the shovel and the pitchfork.” (Is. 30:23,24)
Sorrel is a tangy luxury herb used in salads for human consumption.
Grains which are winnowed have been refined and are also for human consumption.
These verses are therefore making reference to the richness of God’s blessings that await anyone who wholeheartedly repents and changes for the better.
Currently we can enjoy a strong relationship with our heavenly father, and in the future, perfect health in a peaceful, just world. (Is. 32:15-18; 33:24)

Isaiah, chapters 24-28

“[…] Like heat is subdued by the shadow of a cloud,
So the song of the tyrants is silenced.”
~Isaiah 25:5

God’s Word has long prophesied the end of all evil.
How will this be realized?
Isaiah foretells that God “will turn his attention to the army of the heights above and to the kings of the earth upon the earth.” (Is. 24:21)
The “army of the heights above” represents the wicked forces of the spirit realm, so described by the Christian prophet Paul (Eph. 6:12)
The “kings of the earth” are the imperfect humans that govern over humanity.
They fail to recognize Christ’s kingdom and act as if they will not have to render an account to God for their corrupt actions. (Eccl. 8:9)
Instead of doing Jehovah’s will, they succumb to their own selfish interests, thereby realizing the will of Satan and his demonic forces (John 12:31; 1 John 5:19)
Referring to “the army of the heights,” the prophet Isaiah says they will be gathered into a pit, like prisoners, and shut up in the dungeon. (Is. 25:22)
This coincides with the Apostle John’s prophecy in which he describes an angel hurling Satan into an abyss and locking him up for 1,000 years (Re. 20:1-3)
At the end of that period, Satan and his remaining supporters will face the same fate that corrupt leaders will have already faced: hopeless annihilation. (Re. 20:7-10)
At that time, those people who remain, including those who will have been resurrected, will be individually judged and be granted either eternal life or permanent death.
Finally, the ultimate tyrant, Death itself, will be forever silenced (1 Co. 15:22-26; Re. 20:13-15)

Isaiah, Chapters 17-23

“Jehovah will strike Egypt, striking and healing it; and they will return to Jehovah, and he will respond to their entreaties and heal them.”
~Isaiah 19:22

In this prophetic context, Egypt represents the nations of the earth in general. (Re. 11:8)
God will strike them on his judgment day. (Re. 16:14,16)
Throughout the earth, individuals set apart for salvation will then be “healed” in every sense of the word: spiritually, morally, physically, mentally and emotionally. (Re. 22:1,2)
Who will be their deliverer? None other than God’s own son.
(Is. 19:20; He. 2:9,10,14)
In the mean time, there is ‘an altar in the midst of Egypt’ and a ‘pillar on its boundary’ in the sense that God’s servants can be found throughout the nations and yet conduct themselves differently than most of the world around them. (Is. 19:19; Joh. 17:15,16)
God’s servants worship him united and peacefully, regardless of their national origin. (Is. 19:23)

If you would like more details on the minor and major fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecies, you can find it in the online book “Isaiah’s Prophecies” Volume 1 & Volume 2.

Isaiah, Chapters 11-16

“With rejoicing you will draw water
From the springs of salvation.”
~Isaiah 12:3

In some Bible passages, water is a metaphor for knowledge of the true God. (Is. 11:9; Re. 22:17)
An accurate knowledge of Bible teachings can strengthen our faith in God the way streams nourish a leafy tree. (Ps. 1:1-3)
Unlike trees, however, most of us do not have an innate inclination to enjoy Bible reading in and of itself.
A rejoicing attitude toward Bible reading is something that must be conscientiously nurtured.
When we do not read God’s Word regularly, or read it but do not take the time to analyze how it affects our relationship with our heavenly Father, we can begin to depend more on ourselves or on material assets.
In time, spiritual matters may become tedious and cumbersome.
In contrast, the more we get to know Jehovah, the more we perceive his loyal love and we are inclined to rely on him through anxious times.
Then we can share in the prophet’s joyous conviction:

“Look! God is my salvation.I will trust and feel no dread;
For Jah Jehovah is my strength and my might, And he has become my salvation.”
~Is. 12:2

Isaiah, Chapters 6-10

“Look! The true Lord, Jehovah of armies, Is chopping off branches with a terrible crash; The tallest trees are being cut down, And the lofty are brought low.”
~Isaiah 10:33

God has the power to bring down whomever he chooses.
Although he has for the most part left humanity to follow its own course, there are times when he has decided to remove or limit power from certain governors. (Eccl. 8:9)
For example, in ancient Israel, God’s angel put to death the Assyrian regime that had camped outside of Jerusalem. (2 Chron. 32:21; Is. 37:36)
God’s Word states that in the future, he will do away with all imperfect governments and only Christ will rule the earth from heaven. (Is. 9:6,7; Da. 2:44)
It does not matter how powerful a ruler thinks he is; in God’s eyes he is just a person who will eventually be put in his place. (Is. 7:9b; 8:12,13)

Isaiah, Chapters 1-5

‚Äč”Jehovah will enter into judgment with the elders and princes of his people.”
~Isaiah 3:14

Are you tired of seeing religious hypocrisy?
It is relieving to know that God Himself certainly is tired of it and he will call into account insincere ministers using his name to harm others.
In Isaiah’s day, the priests were ‘stealing from the poor’ and ‘crushing God’s people.’ (Is. 3:14,15)
Today, some religious leaders profit from their congregations’ donations. Others use the trust members of their faith have placed in them to exploit them in commercial transactions.
Jehovah God promises to bring back their heartless deeds upon their own heads. (Is. 3:11)
However, we cannot conclude that all organized religion is evil as a result of the misconduct of some.
The prophet compares true worship to a mountain to which peace-lovers turn to in order learn about the true God. (Is. 2:3,4)