Isaiah, chapters 63-66

“But you are among those forsaking Jehovah, {…}
Those setting a table for the god of Good Luck,
And those filling up cups of mixed wine for the god of Destiny.”
~Isaiah 65:11

What is luck?
Some dictionaries define it as a force that operates for good or ill, or chance considered as a force that causes good or bad to happen.
Is the belief in a supernatural force that affects our circumstances in line with God’s way of thinking, as outlined in the Bible?
In ancient times, Luck and Destiny were pagan gods.
Their worshippers traditionally celebrated a party for them on the last day of the last month of the year, where they feasted and drank wine in their honor. (Insight on the Scriptures, vol. I, “God of Luck”)
For a dedicated servant of Jehovah to request a favor, or blessing, from a force other than Jehovah himself, is a form of betrayal. (De. 10:20; Luke 4:8)
The reliance on luck through customs or charms is a superstitious form of Spiritism, a belief that encompasses the practices used to invoke forces or spirits other than Jehovah (demons).
This belief is in direct conflict with true worship. (De. 18:10,11; Is. 8:19,20; Gal. 5:19-21)
Although it seems inoffensive and even polite to wish someone “good luck,” those pleasing Jehovah adjust their thinking to his point of view and take into account his feelings on the matter, knowing all blessings come from him alone in due time. (Is. 65:16,17,24)

Isaiah, chapters 58-62

“[…] Truth has stumbled in the public square,
And what is upright is unable to enter.
Truth has vanished,
And anyone who turns away from bad is plundered.
Jehovah saw this and was displeased,
For there was no justice.”
~Isaiah 59:14b,15

God expects those in positions of authority to do what is just.
He is not a distant, apathetic God, but is watching the earth closely, ready to intervene when it becomes apparent that no one else will (Is. 59:16,17)
God’s justice will leave no stone unturned. (Is. 59:18)
He hears the plight of those who are alone and suffering. (Is. 59:11)
He promises to bless them with eternal life in an earth rid of evil. (Ps. 37:9-11,29; Is. 60:18,20,21)
This was Christ’s primary message and the message Jehovah’s Witnesses likewise share with the public. (Is. 61:1,2)

Isaiah, chapters 52-57

“[…] All your sons will be taught by Jehovah,
And the peace of your sons will be abundant.”
~Isaiah 54:13

One of the identifying markers of true worship is the peacefulness of those who practice it.
Jesus said: “By this all will know that you are my disciples—if you have love among yourselves.” (John 13:35)
Isaiah himself prophesied that in the last days, God’s people would be made up of peace-lovers from different ends of the earth. (Is. 2:2,4)
But is an international brotherhood of peace really something attainable in these divided times we are living?
Jesus also stated: “The things impossible with men are possible with God.” (Luke 18:27)
If we love God and want to follow in Christ’s footsteps, we will not only practice a form of worship free of promoting hatred or war, but will ‘clothe ourselves’ with love in the manner in which we speak and treat those around us on a daily basis. (Col. 3:12-15)

Isaiah, chapters 47-51

“[…] A law will go out from me,
And my justice I will establish as a light to the peoples.”
~Isaiah 51:4

In what way is God’s justice a light?
We use the term “brought to light” when acknowledging truth or facts.
Light is therefore deeply linked to truth and accurate knowledge.
Truth is indispensable when administering justice.
Without accurate knowledge of the facts, perfect justice goes unfulfilled.
Because God is almighty and can even see what lies in everyone’s hearts, he alone can administer perfect justice. (1 Sa. 16:7)
When we read his Word and familiarize ourselves with Bible truths, our faith in his principles guides us through the darkness of uncertainty. (Ps. 43:3)
If our Christian lifestyle reflects God’s light, then we can shine like “illuminators in the world” and bring the hope of divine justice to others. (Php. 2:15)

Isaiah, chapters 43-46

​”[…] Let us bring our case against each other; Tell your side of it to prove you are in the right.”
~Isaiah 43:26

Would you be audacious enough to argue against God to his face?
Could you really hope to prove anything to the One who formed you and everything else in the universe? (Is. 44:24)

“Woe to the one who contends with his Maker,
For he is just an earthenware fragment […].
Should the clay say to the Potter: ‘What are you making?’ […]
Would you question me about the things coming
And command me about my sons and the works of my hands?”
(Is. 45:9,11)

God Jehovah is constant and unchanging. (Is. 43:10)
Unlike us humans who wear out and may sometimes have a change of heart, God’s purpose endures forever. (Is. 46:10,11)
It would be very foolish of us to stubbornly refuse God’s means of salvation even if there are some aspects of it we struggle with on a personal level. (Is. 43:11; 46:12,13)
God offers the waters of salvation through his written Word to those who humbly leave behind their former ways. (Is. 43:18-20)

Isaiah, chapters 38-42

“Instead of peace, I had great bitterness; But in your fondness for me, You preserved me from the pit of destruction […]”
~Isaiah 38:17

God’s will for each one of us is that we may have a fundamental understanding of his loving kindness. (1 Ti. 2:3,4)
He is fond of those trying to obey him and does not want anyone to die. (2 Pe. 3:9)
Although Jehovah God does not miraculously extend the life of all his servants, as he did in King Hezekiah’s case, we can all experience the strength infused by our faith in everlasting life. (Ps. 37:29; Is. 38:1-5; Da. 3:17,18; Acts 7:54-60; Ro. 14:7,8)
The real “pit of destruction” all of God’s servants are saved from represents the hopeless and despairing state of ignoring his will.
Said ignorance could ultimately lead to the destruction of our very souls. (John 3:36)
Those who are faithful are spared said despair even during trying times.
We find strength in God’s words, just like Hezekiah did, and know that regardless of what happens, we will ultimately be restored to life (Is. 38:16)

Isaiah, chapters 34-37

“‘We trust in Jehovah our God,’ is he not the one whose high places and altars Hezekiah has removed […]?”
Isaiah 36:7

Hezekiah’s father, apostate King Ahaz, had littered Judah with pagan altars and had closed the doors of the temple in Jerusalem. (2 Ch. 28:23-25)
Upon coming to the throne at age 25, Hezekiah reinstated divine worship according to Mosaic Law, celebrated a Passover to which even people from the northern tribes of Israel attended, and reorganized the Levite priesthood. (2 Ch. 29:1-5; 30:1-5)
The “high places and altars” Hezekiah had removed were not places of worship to his God, Jehovah, but to pagan deities.
The king of Assyria sent a messenger threatening Hezekiah to submit his people to Assyrian rule.
That messenger publicly accused Hezekiah of bringing down Jehovah’s altars, questioning whether Jehovah would save Jerusalem after the king’s recklessness.
It was unbeknownst to him that Hezekiah had actually been doing God’s will during his entire kingship and had no reason to fear Assyrian conquest.
We may sometimes experience similar accusations from our loved ones when we do something that is in line with Biblical principles but in conflict with what the world generally considers to be “good.”
For example, a woman studying the Bible may feel inclined to leave the man she is living with, although he may be a “good” man by the world’s standards, if he has no intention of legalizing their union.
She might receive severe criticism from her family or coworkers even though she is in fact doing the right thing. (1 Co. 7:39; 2 Co. 6:14)
Or a Christian man who abstains from celebrating holidays of pagan origin with his extended family may be accused of isolating himself and being intolerant of others, even though he is only trying to practice Christianity as it was originally practiced by first century Christians. (2 Co. 6:16,17)
There are many cases in which the stance of those trying to carry out God’s will may be misinterpreted.
We do well to avoid arguing and find solace in the satisfaction of having obeyed our conscience. (Is. 36:21)
Such a strong relationship with God gives us joy and the reassurance that he will never desert us. (Is. 35:10)
If you would like to view a (completely free) film reenacting the greatest trial of King Hezekiah’s faith, follow this link: https://tv.jw.org/#en/video/VODMovies/pub-tiy_x_VIDEO
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